2011 Community College Global Education Symposium

Peace and Conflict: Ten Years after 9/11

November 9-10, 2011


Program Flyer
Schedule at a Glance
Concurrent Session Descriptions
Program Materials
Directions & Parking Information
Hotel Information

Register HERE

 

World View’s 2011 Community College Symposium explores the ten years post September 11 and how this significant 21st century event has shaped global perspectives in geopolitics, East-West relations, and educational discourse. We will also look at the nature and causes of international conflict, human rights, peace resolutions, and more. This symposium offers general sessions, concurrent sessions, and workshop sessions for instructors to internationalize their courses

The program is designed for faculty and administrators of all disciplines, providing current information and unique strategies for helping students learn about the world. Professional Development Contact Hours will be offered.

Featured Speakers

DorffRobin Dorff. Robin Dorff joined the Strategic Studies Institute in June 2007 as Research Professor of National Security Affairs. He previously served on the USAWC faculty as a Visiting Professor and as Professor of National Security Policy and Strategy in the Department of National Security and Strategy, where he also held the General Maxwell D. Taylor Chair and served as Department Chairman. Dorff has been a Senior Advisor with Creative Associates International, Inc., in Washington, DC, and served as Executive Director of the Institute of Political Leadership in Raleigh, NC. Dr. Dorff remains extensively involved in strategic leadership development, focusing on national security strategy and policy, and strategy formulation. Dorff holds a B.A. in Political Science from Colorado College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Robin Kirk. Robin Kirk is the Program Director of the Duke Human Rights Center and a member of the steering committee of the Pauli Murray Project, an initiative of the center that seeks to use the legacy of this Durham daughter to examine the region’s past of slavery, segregation and continuing economic inequality. Kirk directs a program for Duke students in Belfast, in partnership with Healing Through Remembering. She is the Director of Undergraduate Studies of Duke’s International Comparative Studies program. Kirk is the author of three books, including More Terrible Than Death: Massacres, Drugs and America’s War in Colombia and The Monkey’s Paw: New Chronicles from Peru . She is the coeditor of The Peru Reader: History, Culture, Politics and helps edit Duke University Press’s World Readers series. An essayist and award-winning poet, she has published widely on issues as diverse as the Andes, torture, family life, and pop culture.

Charles Kurzman. Charles Kurzman is a professor of sociology at theUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and author of “The Missing Martyrs: Why There Are So Few Muslim Terrorists” (Oxford University Press, 2011), as well as “The Unthinkable Revolution in Iran” (2004) and “Democracy Denied, 1905-1915″ (2008), and editor of anthologies on “Liberal Islam” (1998) and “Modernist Islam, 1840-1940″ (2002). His work has been noted by CNN, Fox News, the New York Times, and other major media, as well as by members of Congress and by Islamic movements around the world – a radical Islamic group in Indonesia accused him of posing as a false “prophet,” and Congressman Peter King (R-NY) called his research “biased.” Professor Kurzman denies both of these accusations, but is flattered by the attention.

Christian Lundberg is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at UNC at Chapel Hill teaching courses on globalization and communication. His current interests and research focus on the relationship between violence, trope, and the constitution of publics, with special attention to the ways that these three are coordinated in religious communities. Lundberg received his Masters of Divinity from Emory University and Ph.D. from Northwestern University.

 

David Schanzer.  David Schanzer is an associate professor of the practice at Duke University and director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, a research consortium between Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill and RTI International. He also serves as the director for strategy and outreach for the Institute of Homeland Security Solutions, a North Carolina-based research consortium focused on applied social science research for homeland security. Prior to his academic appointments, Schanzer was the Democratic staff director for the House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security from 2003 to 2005. He previously served as the legislative director for Sen. Jean Carnahan (2001-2002), counsel to Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (1996-1998), and counsel to Sen. William S. Cohen (1994-1996). Schanzer is a graduate of Harvard College and of Harvard Law School.

Program At-A-Glance*

Wednesday, November 9 Thursday, November 10
8:00 Check In and Registration 8:00 Coffee, Juice, and Pastries
8:30 Welcome
Carol Tresolini
UNC Vice Provost for
Academic InitiativesLt. Governor Walter Dalton
8:30 American Counterterrorism -
A Strategy for the Post-bin Laden World

David Schanzer
Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security
Duke, UNC at Chapel Hill, and RTI International
8:45 America’s Global Role after 9/11
Robin Dorff
Strategic Studies Institute
U.S. Army War College
9:30 Human Rights in a Post 9/11 World
Robin Kirk
Duke Human Rights Center
Duke University
9:45 Why There Are So Few Muslim Terrorists
Charles Kurzman
Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations
kurzman.unc.edu/islamic-terrorism/data/
10:30 Break
10:45 Break and Book Signing
The Missing Martyrs by Charles Kurzman
10:45 Peace and Conflict in Media
Christian Lundberg
Department of Communication Studies
UNC at Chapel Hill
11:00 Concurrent Sessions I:
Conflict and Peace – Key Issues and World Regions
12:00
Next Steps and Adjournment
Robert Phay, World View
1) Food and Environmental Insecurity in Global Conflicts
Jessica Braswell
Department of Environmental Science
Queens University of Charlotte
2) European Union Peacekeeping in Europe
Robert Jenkins
Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies
UNC at Chapel Hill
3) China on the World Stage: Potential Conflicts and How they Might be Addressed
Robert Howes
U.S. State Department Foreign Service (Retired)
4) Post 9/11 Africa
Owen Kalinga
Department of History
NC State University
12:15 Lunch
1:15 Concurrent Session II:
Conflict and Peace – Key Issues and World Regions
1) The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Shai Tamari
Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civlizations
2) Geopolitics and the Viel: Fear, Security, and the Muslim ‘Other’ in Europe
Banu Gokariksel
Department of Geography
UNC at Chapel Hill
3) Building Peace and Community through Murals in Latin America and North Carolina
LeAnne Disla
Duke-UNC Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Hector Blanco, Francisco Radhames Blanco, Maximo Ceballo, Fausto Ramirez, and Wilson Antonio Rodriguez
Movimiento Artistico Hermanas Mirabal (MARHMI)
4) Central Asia: Regional Conflicts, Transnational Challenges, and Global Responses
Zumrat Salmorbekova
Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies
UNC at Chapel Hill
2:30 Break
2:45 Concurrent Sessions III:
Conflict and Peace – Key Issues and World Regions
1) Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries: A Bottom-up Solution
Larry Chavis
Kenan Flagler Business School
UNC at Chapel Hill
2) Refugee Resettlement 101
Jason Payne
Refugee Resettlement Services, Lutheran Family Services Carolinas
3) China on the World Stage: Potential Conflicts and How they Might be Addressed
Robert Howes
U.S. State Department Foreign Service (Retired)
4) Building Peace and Community through Murals in Latin America and North Carolina
LeAnne Disla
Duke-UNC Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Hector Blanco, Francisco Radhames Blanco, Maximo Ceballo, Fausto Ramirez, and Wilson Antonio Rodriguez
Movimiento Artistico Hermanas Mirabal (MARHMI)
4:00 Introduction to Curriculum Development Sessions
4:10 Curriculum Development Sessions: Working with National Resource Centers on Creating International Modules for your Courses
1) Middle East and Africa
Regina Higgins
Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim CivilizationsMohamed Abou El Seoud
UNC University LibrariesJulie Kinnaird, World View
2) Asia
Karla Loveall
Asian/Pacific Studies Institute, Duke UniversityLeslie Hodges, World View
3) Europe
Erica Edwards and Gali Beeri
UNC Center for European Studies/EU Center of ExcellenceCarina Brossy, World View
4) Latin America and General Global Issues
LeAnne Disla
Duke-UNC Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean StudiesNeil Bolick, World View
5:00 Reception at the home of Robert and Jean Phay

*Program is subject to change.

Click here for printable PDF version of the  program.