Europe at a Crossroads

Europe at Crossroads - CroppedMarch 23 – 24, 2016

Location: The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education

Cost: $175 per person. $600 for a team of four. $150 for each additional member. Both Seminars: $325 per person. $425 for out-of-state. $1200 for team of four. $150 for each additional member.

Europe at a Crossroads Seminar will explore critical issues facing Europe: Europe’s Islamic face, Putin and Russia’s ascendancy on the world stage, the European economy, the European Union, and the refugee crisis. Breakout sessions continue with key issues and resources to teach about Europe, including literature in the new Europe, Europe’s cities, education, environmental movements, global citizenship, teaching with European folktales, understanding Europe through film, and lesson plans, classroom activities and media resources for Europe.


Featured Speakers

timmhTimothy Humphrey. Timothy L Humphrey is currently the vice president of Analytics & Acquisitions for IBM’s Supply Chain. Previously, Humphrey held various supply chain executive roles spanning software sales transaction support and strategy, among others. Prior to joining IBM, Humphrey led the design, development and launch of several products and technologies for Lenovo and IBM. Humphrey has twenty years of global experience in the computing industry and currently serves on the Wake County Boys & Girls Clubs Board of Directors and World View’s Advisory Board. Humphrey is also a very active mentor to over 30 global professionals, students and youth. Humphrey graduated from North Carolina State University in 1996 with a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering.

 

hooghe2Liesbet Hooghe. Liesbet Hooghe is the W.R. Kenan Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill. She was educated in Belgium, and held postdoctoral fellowships at Cornell University, the KU Leuven, and Nuffield (Oxford University). Before joining UNC  2000 she taught at the University of Toronto. She is the past Chair of the European Politics and Society Section of APSA, and of the European Union Studies Association. Her interests lie in the European Union, multilevel governance, decentralization, international organization, political parties, elite studies and public opinion. Her recent books include The European Commission in the 21st Century ( co-authored) and The Rise of Regional Authority: A Comparative Study of 42 OECD Democracies (with Gary Marks & Arjan H. Schakel).

 

Don and St. BasilsDonald Raleigh. Donald J. Raleigh is the Jay Richard Judson Distinguished Professor of Russian History and Director of the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  He has authored, translated, and edited numerous books on modern Russian history including Revolution on the Volga (1986), Experiencing Russia’s Civil War (2002), and Soviet Baby Boomers (2012), which was short listed for the Pushkin House Prize in Great Britain.  He currently is working on a biography of Soviet leader Leonid Ilich Brezhnev.

 

 

TASAR PHOTOEren Tasar. Eren Tasar is an assistant professor of Central Asian history at UNC-Chapel Hill. He is interested in Islam and politics in Central Eurasia. His first book, Soviet and Muslim: the Institutionalization of Islam in Central Asia, analyzes Soviet policies toward Islam during the second half of the last century. Before coming to Carolina, he taught at the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts in Indianapolis and at Washington University in St. Louis.

 

 

 

Gary Marks. Gary Marks is Burton Craige Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill and also is a professor at the Free University of Amsterdam. From 2016 Professor Marks will be appointed to the newly created Ernst B. Haas Chair at the Robert Schuman Center, European University Institute, Florence. Marks was educated in England and received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. In 2010 he was awarded a Humboldt Research Prize for his contributions to political science and in the same year received an advanced ERC grant of €4.2 million to support his research. Professor Marks co-founded and directed the UNC Center for European Studies and European Union Center of Excellence from 1994 to 2006. He has published ten books and over one hundred scholarly articles. Marks’ writings have been cited more than 20,000 times.

 

downloadRobert Jenkins. Robert Jenkins is the director of graduate studies of the Russian, Eurasian, and East European Studies concentration in the M.A. degree in global studies and a senior lecturer in the Department of Political Science. He previously served as the director of the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill. Jenkins received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Madison-Wisconsin. Jenkins’ scholarly interests are in the areas of social and political schange, political conflict, civil society and the nonprofit sector and education. He has traveled throughout Eastern Europe and has lived in Budapest and Vienna.

 


 Schedule

Wednesday, March 23 Thursday, March 24
1:00 CHECK IN AND REGISTRATION 8:00 COFFEE, JUICE AND PASTRIES
1:30 Welcome
Neil Bolick and Charlé LaMonica
World View
UNC-Chapel HillTim Humphrey
VP of Analytics & Acquisitions, IBM
World View Advisory Board
8:30 Ethnic Conflict and Minority Rights in Eastern Europe
Robert Jenkins
Department of Political Science
UNC-Chapel Hill
1:45 The European Union and the Economic Crisis
Liesbet Hooghe
Department of Political Science
UNC-Chapel Hill
9:40 TRANSITION TO CONCURRENT SESSIONS
2:45 BREAK 9:45 CONCURRENT SESSIONS I: UNDERSTANDING EUROPE AND THE EU
3:00 Putin and Russia’s Ascendancy on the World Stage
Donald Raleigh
Department of History
UNC-Chapel Hill
1. The Role of the European Union Prize for Literature
Sarah Hutchinson
Center for European Studies
UNC-Chapel Hill
4:00 What is the European Union and Why Is It Important?
Gary Marks
Department of Political Science
UNC-Chapel Hill
2. The Refugee Crises and Management in Historical Perspective
Derek Holmgren
Department of History
UNC-Chapel Hill
5:15 RECEPTION
Friday Center for Continuing Education
 3. Past and Present Issues facing the European Metropolis
Priscilla Layne-Kopf
Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages
UNC-Chapel Hill
4. Germany’s Role in Europe [Required for Germany Study Visit Participants]
Holger Moroff
Department of Political Science
UNC-Chapel Hill
10:45 BREAK
11:00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS II: UNDERSTANDING AND TEACHING EUROPE AND THE EU
Understanding Europe and the EU
1. Germany and its School System [Required for Germany Study Visit Participants] Björn Hennings
Carolina Center for Educational Excellence
UNC-Chapel Hill
2. Environmental Movements in Europe
Greg Gangi
Institute for the Environment
UNC-Chapel Hill
Teaching Europe and the EU
3. Teaching Europe through Music
Lauren Jennings
Department of Music
UNC-Chapel Hill
4. Using Deliberation to Encourage Critical Thinking & Global Citizenship
Paul Bonnici
NC Civic Education Consortium
UNC-Chapel Hill
12:00 LUNCH
[Germany Study Visit participants will meet for briefing and lunch]
1:00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS III: TEACHING EUROPE AND THE EU
1. Exploring Europe through Project-Based Learning
Cathy Dalimonte, Christi Clark and Tori Carpenter
Queens Creek Elementary
Onslow County SchoolsLaura Thompson
Clyde Erwin Elementary
Onslow County Schools
2. Teaching Today’s Europe: Resources from the Center for European Studies
Kathleen Shanahan Lindner
Center for European Studies
UNC-Chapel Hill
3. European Migration: Exploring Difference in the Classroom

Cartoons
Angela Ritter
Department of Romance Languages and Literature
UNC-Chapel Hill

4. Teaching about Europe through Film
Eileen Mattingly
Journeys in Film
2:00 BREAK
2:15 Europe’s Islamic Face
Eren Tasar
Department of History
UNC-Chapel Hill
3:15 Closing Remarks and Adjournment
Charlé LaMonica and Neil Bolick
World View
UNC-Chapel Hill

*Program subject to change.


Session Descriptions
K-5 and Administrators | K-12 and Community College | 6-12
6-12 and Community College 
| 9-12| 9-12 and Administrators 9-12 and Community College

GRADES K-5 and ADMINISTRATORS 
Exploring Europe through Project-Based Learning
Cathy Dalimonte, Christi Clark and Tori Carpenter, Queens Creek Elementary
Laura Thompson, Clyde Erwin Elementary Magnet School of International Studies & Cultural Arts
Onslow County School System
Participants will explore project based learning experiences taught at the elementary level which also connects to learning about Europe. Featured in this session is a special fourth-grade PBL funded by a grant from World View and the UNC Center for European Studies, which was implemented at two schools with different takes on the same problem.
GRADES K-12 and COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Teaching Today’s Europe: Resources from the Center for European Studies
Kathleen Shanahan Lindner, Center for European Studies, UNC-Chapel HillFrom booklets and materials to student competitions and teacher professional development opportunities, come to this session to learn all about the free K-12 and community college resources the Center for European Studies has to offer!
Past and Present Issues Facing the European Metropolis
Priscilla Dionne Layne-Kopf, Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel HillWhile major European cities like London, Paris and Berlin have always been especially modern and attracted settlement from diverse groups, the make-up of these cities changed dramatically following the end of WWII, which both ushered in an era of peace and one of new fears including terrorism and the death of the welfare state. One of the greatest factors affecting this change is migration, whether in the form of immigration, guest workers or refugees. This session will consider how the changing demographics of Europe’s cities has affected their socio-political and cultural landscapes.
Teaching Europe through Music
Lauren Jennings, Department of Music, UNC-Chapel HillThis session focuses on using Western art music as a lens through which to teach European history, literature and culture, both inside and beyond the music classroom. Two brief case studies will introduce key repertoire and ideas, while modeling how to encourage students to think broadly about the relationship between musical style, musical meaning and the wider political, social and cultural contexts in which it was (and is) created and performed. The session will also introduce educators to print and online resources useful for both lesson preparation and student work. No previous musical knowledge expected or required–this session is designed to be of interest to educators from all backgrounds.
Germany and its School System
Björn Hennings, School of Education, UNC-Chapel HillThis session will offer participants an introduction to the history and diversity of the Germany school system, its benefits and its current challenges. This session is required for participants on the Germany study visit.
GRADES 6-12
Using Deliberation to Encourage Critical Thinking & Global Citizenship
Paul Bonnici, NC Civic Education Consortium, UNC-Chapel HillHandout #1
Handout #2Do you want your students to better understand and appreciate global perspectives and be more critical thinkers? This session will focus on how to teach the skills of civic deliberation using a structured, small group process for reading, deep discussion and critical thinking regarding controversial global issues. Participants will also take part in a deliberation about climate change and learn how to access free on-line lesson plans that will help students become better thinkers and readers.
GRADES 6-12 and COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Refugee Crises and Management in Historical Perspective
Derek Holmgren, Department of History, UNC-Chapel HillThis session will examine European reactions to the present-day refugee crisis and attempts to manage it. To better understand the current problems and efforts to resolve them, they must also be contextualized through discussion of earlier cases of mass displacement and how they were resolved during the past century in Europe. The presentation will address lessons learned from past experiences as well as the limits to applying them today or the future.
Teaching about Europe through Film
Eileen Mattingly, Journeys in FilmFilms about European history can capture students’ imagination while giving them an understanding of events and historical figures; the challenge for the teacher is to separate historical truth from Hollywood romanticization. Some films present an accurate picture of events while other films serve as simple entertainment or even propaganda. This session will examine ways to integrate film into your classroom, while still meeting standards. The presenter will discuss best practices for selecting and using films, explain how interdisciplinary lessons can broaden student understanding and show clips from several useful films on topics such as the Holocaust and the Cold War. Participants will also receive a sample film guide and information about downloading other free lessons.
European Migration: Exploring Difference in the Classroom
Angela Ritter, Department of Romance Studies, UNC-Chapel HillCartoonsThis session will use visual representations as a means to explore the challenges with immigration in Europe, largely focusing on religious tension in France, though the approach is applicable to many  difference in various locations. Participants will engage in a pedagogical activity that can be reproduced in their classrooms in order to learn approaches to a sensitive topic while engaging in meaningful discussion around some of the challenges that are relevant to the topic of migration in Europe. Veiling, terrorism and the portrayal of the “other” will be addressed through the analysis of popular comics from within France, Europe. and internationally. This exercise will demonstrate how to gain different perspectives, as well as underline the importance of image, text and representation.
GRADES 9-12 and ADMINISTRATORS 
Germany’s Role in Europe
Holger Moroff, Department of Political Science, UNC-Chapel HillGermany is a pivotal player in current crises facing the EU on the inside and outside. The Greek debt crisis, the refugee crisis, and Russia’s redrawing of borders in Eastern Europe are prime examples that will be explored in greater detail in this session.  Germany’s decision to abandon nuclear power and subsidize renewable energy represents a game changing move for modern, industrialized economies and will also be examined during this session. This session is required for participants on the Germany study visit.
GRADES 9-12
Environmental Movements in Europe
Greg Gangi, Institute for the Environment, UNC-Chapel HillThis session will cover environmental movements in Europe including Energiewende in Germany and the Slow Food Movement in Italy.
GRADES 9-12 and COMMUNITY COLLEGE
The Role of the European Union Prize for Literature
Sarah Hutchison, Center for European Studies, UNC-Chapel HillThe European Union Prize for Literature is given each year to promote literature within Europe and spotlight creativity within the 37 countries in the EU Culture Programme. This session will investigate the EU’s Prize for Literature in order to explore its purpose and relevance. A few of the recent winners and their works will be discussed and examined by participants.

Pre-Program Material

Week 1 – Recommended Reading: What Europe Means to the YoungThe Economist. 5 September 2015.

Week 2 – Recommended Reading and Study Guide: The European Union: A Guide for Americans

Week 3 – Recommended Reading: The Fear of the Other EuropeGeopolitical Weekly. 24 November 2015.

Week 4 – Recommended Reading: Robertson, Chiyo. The best engineers come from GermanyBBC News. 18 September 2013.