2015 K-12 Global Education Symposium

From Local to Global:
Exploring Environmental Sustainability

October 21 – 22, 2015

Our K-12 Global Education Symposium is held each October at the William and Ida Friday Center in Chapel Hill, NC. This day-and-a-half program explores significant global issues, offers best practices in global education, and provides educators an opportunity to develop a global action plan for their classroom, school, or system. The 2015 symposium will focus on global environment and sustainability. video

Cost: $175 per person. A team of four is $600. $150 for each additional member. $250 for out-of-state.

Location: The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education

This symposium is co-sponsored by the NC State Board of Education and the Department of Public Instruction and UNC at Chapel Hill School of Education, with additional support from the UNC campus-wide theme of water in our world. This program will take place at UNC’s Friday Center. 


Flyer  |  Schedule  | Featured SpeakersReadings and Study Guide  |  Session Descriptions


Program Spotlight: Screening of the award-winning film, Landfill Harmonic

Landfill Harmonic.  Landfill Harmonic follows the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura, a paraguayan musical youth group of kids that live next to one of South America’s largest landfills. This unlikely orchestra plays music from instruments made entirely out of garbage. When their story goes viral, the orchestra is catapulted into the global spotlight. With the guidance of their music director, they must navigate this new world of arenas and sold out concerts. However, when a natural disaster devastates their community, the orchestra provides a source of hope for the town. The film is a testament to the transformative power of music and the resilience of the human spirit. Landfill Harmonic has been featured on 60 Minutes, NPR, and in Variety magazine. The film has also been awarded prizes from the SXSW Film Festival, the Maui Film Festival, the Sheffield Doc/Fest Environmental Jury and the San Francisco Green Film Festival. The Recycled Orchestra has performed at the New York International Children’s Film Festival and, most recently, for Pope Francis. Read more…

Featured Speakers

Alice_AmmermanAlice  Ammerman. Alice Ammerman is a professor in the Department of Nutrition in the Gillings School of Public Heath at UNC-Chapel Hill, where she also serves as the director for the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Ammerman’s recent research interests focus on school nutrition policy associated with childhood obesity, sustainable agriculture as it relates to improved nutrition, and social entrepreneurship as a sustainable approach to addressing public health concerns. Ammerman was appointed by the Lieutenant Governor to serve on the Childhood Obesity Study Committee and serves on the Governor’s Task Force for Healthy Carolinians. Ammerman received her doctoral degree in nutrition from UNC-Chapel Hill. Read more…


John BrunoJohn Bruno. John Bruno is a marine ecologist and professor in the department of biology at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research is focused on marine biodiversity and macroecology, coral reef ecology and conservation and the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. Bruno earned his Ph.D. from Brown University in ecology and evolutionary biology and was a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University in disease ecology. The research in his lab is focused on understanding and conserving the structure and dynamics of ocean ecosystems. He primarily works in the Caribbean – including Belize, the Bahamas, and Cuba – but also in coastal North Carolina and Ecuador on applied wetland projects and in shallow subtidal habitats in the Galapagos Islands. Bruno is also a science communicator and co-developer of the oceans website SeaMonster (theseamonster.net). Read more…


strauss_ron_web2Ron Strauss. Ron Strauss is University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Executive Vice Provost and Chief International Officer. He holds joint appointments in three schools: Professor in the School of Dentistry’s Department of Dental Ecology, Professor in the School of Medicine’s Department of Social Medicine and Professor in the Gillings School of Global Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology. As Executive Vice Provost, he works closely with the Deans’ Council in overseeing many of the University’s core functions. As Chief International Officer, he provides leadership to the global programs and partnerships of the University. Strauss is a spokesperson for UNC’s pan-university global endeavors. Throughout his tenure at Carolina, Strauss has been extremely active in public service and engagement, both locally and globally.  He is the lead faculty member on the UNC Faculty Engaged Scholars Program of the Carolina Center for Public Service. His education includes a BA in Biology from Queens College (City University of New York), a D.M.D. (Doctorate in Dentistry) from the University of Pennsylvania, and a subsequent MA and PhD in Sociology, also from the University of Pennsylvania. His global work has included being a visiting professor in Brazil and Israel, and conducting social research in Thailand, Moldova and China.


bob walkerRobert Walker. Robert Walker is the president of the Population Institute, an international non-profit that educates policymakers and the public about population and seeks to promote universal access to family planning information, education and services. As president he directs the organization’s advocacy and public education activities, including its work on issues related to health, economic development, sustainability and the environment. Walker was formerly the executive director of the Common Cause Education Fund, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization working to promote open, honest and accountable government. Previously, Walker worked for a total of fourteen years on Capitol Hill. Walker received his B.A. in economics from Rockford College and his J.D. from the University of Illinois School of Law. He attended the University of Sydney in Australia under a Rotary graduate fellowship. Read more…


Schedule At-A-Glance

Wednesday, October 21 Thursday, October 22
8:00 CHECK IN AND REGISTRATION 8:00 COFFEE, JUICE AND PASTRIES
8:30 Welcome
Charlé LaMonica, Director
World View
UNC-Chapel Hill
Rebecca Garland
Deputy State Superintendent
NC Department of Public Instruction
8:30 Population and Sustainability: Meeting the Needs of Today; Preserving the Ecological Resources of TomorrowExecutive Overview of Demographic Vulnerability

Robert Walker, President
Population Institute
(Washington, D.C.)Request a FREE copy of the OVER book.

8:45 How Do You Make a School More Global? UNC Global Lessons Leanred
Ron Strauss
UNC-Chapel Hill
9:45 BREAK 
9:15 The Human Impact of Climate Change on the Oceans
John Bruno, Professor
Department of Biology
UNC-Chapel Hill
10:00 Landfill Harmonic: The World Sends Us Garbage, We Send Back Music
Juliana Peñaranda-Loftus,
Producer and Co-Director
The Landfill Harmonic Movie
10:30 BREAK 12:00
Next Steps and Adjournment
Charlé LaMonica, Director
World View
UNC-Chapel Hill
10:45 Concurrent Sessions
GRADES K-5
1. Literacy + Global Education = Engaged Students Ending Hunger
Jen Girten and John Claude Bemis
Heifer International
GRADES 6-12
2. Connecting Climate Change, Air Pollution, and Human Health Globally
Jason West
Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering
UNC-Chapel Hill
3. Fueling our Future: Evaluating Today’s and Tomorrow’s Global Energy System
Dana Haine
Institute for the Environment
UNC-Chapel Hill
GRADES 9-12
4. Get the G.I.S.T: A Cross-Discipline Journey to a Global Immersion School
Heather LaJoie, Martha Deiss and
Deb Semmler
East Mecklenburg High School
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
GRADES K-12
5. Business of the Environment: Is Business Compatible with Environmental Practices?
Carol Hee
Kenan-Flagler Business School
UNC-Chapel Hill
6. Travel Abroad with World View! Information Session and Discussion
Neil Bolick and Charlé LaMonica
World View
UNC-Chapel Hill
Björn Hennings
Carolina Center for Educational Excellence
UNC-Chapel Hill
Odilie Calvo
Immersion Abroad Costa Rica
 7. Connecting Cultures through Farming and Food: Transplanting Traditions
Kelly Owensby
Transplanting Traditions Community Farm
Orange County Partnership for Young Children
 8. Withering the Waste Stream – Understanding Waste, Recycling and Compost for Individuals, Schools and Communities
Muriel Williman
Orange County Solid Waste Management
MRF in Action Video
Dan Schnitzer
Chapel Hill-Carrboro City School District
 9. Sustainability at Work and Home
Kristin Blank-White and Cindy Shea
Sustainability @ UNC
UNC-Chapel Hill
10. Exploring the Environment through Digital Storytelling
Rebecca Morris
Library and Information Studies
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
12:00 LUNCH (provided)
1:15 Concurrent Sessions
GRADES 6-12
1. Encouraging Global Citizenship & Critical Thinking in the 6-12 Classroom
Deliberating in a Democracy Handout
Paul Bonnici
NC Civic Education Consortium
UNC-Chapel Hill
2. Hazardous Waste: From Local Issue to Global Impacts
Sarah Yelton
Institute for the Environment
UNC-Chapel Hill
3. Introducing Students to Environmental Justice
Scott Morrison
Education Department
Elon University
4. Designing a Sustainable City
David Salvesen
Center for Sustainable Community Design
UNC-Chapel Hill
GRADES 9-12
5. Student Travel with a Purpose
Sarah Dancausse, Alicia Lee,
Tara Sivamani, and Christopher Waluk
Garner Magnet High School
Wake County Public School System
GRADES K-12
6. Feeding 9 Billion and Beyond – The Importance of Scientific Literacy in Global Food Security
Greg Pillar
Chemistry and Environmental Science
Queens University of Charlotte
7. The GREEN Dream – An Elementary School’s Journey to Become a NC Green
School of Excellence
Handout #1
Handout #2
Jason Barnes, Cathy Dalimonte, Rebecca Harris, Krystal Miller and Kristin Reid
Queens Creek Elementary
Onslow County Schools
8. Cohorts or Engineers?: Students Initiate Lasting Environmental Change on Campus
Simon Keilty
Charlotte Country Day School
9. Global Opportunities On the Field: Lessons for Teachers and Students
Julia Vaughan
Charles Koontz Intermediate School
Buncombe County Schools
10. Global Education Teacher Leader Meeting*
Julie Kinnaird
World View
UNC-Chapel Hill
*This session is only for members of the World View teacher-leader institute
2:30 BREAK
2:45 Concurrent Sessions
GRADES K-5
1. Blast Off into STEM Notebooking
Emily Hardee and Kelly Wilson
Brentwood Magnet Elementary School of Engineering
Wake County Public School System
2. My World, Our World: Environmental Sustainability in the Elementary Classroom
Elizabeth Crawford
College of Education
UNC Wilmington
Stephanie Dean
Northwoods Elementary Magnet
School of Technology and Innovation
Onslow County Schools
Claire Roehl
Edward Best Elementary School
Franklin County Schools
3. Engaging and Empowering Students through Service LearningHandout #1Handout #2

Elizabeth Pulliam, Sandra Lubchenko, and Joanie Langer
Brooks Global Studies
Guilford County Schools

GRADES 6-12
4. From Static to Dynamic: Tech Tools for Engaging Global Learners
Carina Brossy
World View Outreach Network
UNC-Chapel Hill
5. The Drawbridge Strategy: A Case Study for Understanding Environmental Perspectives
Scott Morrison
Department of Education
Elon University
6. Well, Water We Doing in Science Today?!
Crystal Harden, Amber Vogel and Daniel Wheeler
Morehead Planetarium
UNC-Chapel Hill
GRADES 9-12
7. Building Global Partnerships: Focus on Environmental Issues
Eric Cole
McDowell High School
McDowell County Public Schools
GRADES K-12
8. Recipe for Disaster: Hollywood Science and Scientific Literacy
Greg Pillar
Chemistry and Environmental Science
Queens University of Charlotte
9. State Board of Education Strategic Plan: Global-Ready Schools and Educators
Helga Fasciano
NC Department of Public Instruction
 10. Teaching Environmental Sustainability through a UNICEF Lens
Daniel Sadowsky
U.S. Fund for UNICEF
4:00 Team Meetings on Action Plans/Curriculum Development OR
Alternate General Session, for those educators not in teams:
From Farm to Fork: Building North Carolina’s Sustainable, Local Food Economy
BBQ Recipe
Heart Healthy Hush Puppies
Alice Ammerman, Professor
Department of Nutrition
UNC-Chapel Hill
5:00 RECEPTION
Friday Center for Continuing Education

Team Meetings on Action Plans and Curriculum Development

We ask symposium participants to come to the symposium as a school-based or district-based team when possible, and each team is asked to draft an action plan to take back to its school and implement. For that purpose, we have set aside an action team meeting and a curriculum development session on the first day, where a team meeting facilitator will work with the team as a resource person and meeting facilitator. A facilitator will also be available for the curriculum development session. A sample action plan and a reference booklet (Action Planning for Global Education) are available for your preparation on our website.

The action plan focus can be on the symposium topic or another topic of your choosing. You may turn in a copy of your action plan at the end of the symposium or, if you prefer, you may take it home to finish and mail it back to World View. If your team knows what it will focus on during the action team meeting, please send an email to Alex at World View (afaulkenbury@unc.edu) so we can match your team’s needs to an appropriate facilitator. If you choose not to meet as a team, please also let us know.

Session Descriptions: 

 K-5 | K-12 | 6-12 | 9-12

GRADES K-5
Literacy + Global Education = Engaged Students Ending Hunger
Jen Girten and John Claude Bemis, Heifer International
The journey to becoming active global citizens and compassionate decision makers can begin in the elementary grades. Heifer International, a global non-profit dedicated to ending hunger and poverty, offers a number of educational resources to help bring global awareness into the classroom. Participants in this session will brainstorm ways to inspire and engage students to take action to end hunger and poverty and discuss additional resources of interest. UNC alumnus and author John Bemis will share his experiences traveling to Heifer project sites in Rwanda to research for his book Flora and the Runaway Rooster and share his reflections on the importance of teaching global citizenship.
My World, Our World: Environmental Sustainability in the Elementary Classroom
Elizabeth Crawford, College of Education, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Stephanie Dean, Northwoods Elementary Magnet School of Technology and Innovation, Onslow County Schools
Claire Roehl, Edward Best Elementary School, Franklin County Schools
How can educators teach children about the environment in ways that inspire and empower, as opposed to depress and distress? This session highlights developmentally appropriate and relevant learning experiences whereby children connect with their world—fostering a sense of awe, reverence and responsibility for the environment—before expanding to issues facing our world. Classroom examples and resources on issues such as the declining bee population and our global food system will be explored.
Blast Off into STEM Notebooking
Kelly Wilson and Emily Hardee, Brentwood Magnet Elementary School of Engineering, Wake County Public Schools
In this session, participants will complete an engineering challenge and use STEM notebooks to capture their learning.  Useful strategies to incorporate STEM notebooks into all your academic subjects will also be shared.
Service Learning with Heifer International
Elizabeth Pulliam, Sandra Lubchenko and Joanie Langer, Brooks Global Studies Extended Year Magnet School, Guilford County Schools
Learn about using Heifer International and The Water Project as a service learning projects to develop globally aware students. K-5 teachers from Brooks Global Studies Magnet School will share lesson plans, ideas, resources, and success stories. These teachers saw the powerful impact service learning had on their students’ thinking and problem solving as they worked to find sustainable solutions to world problems.
GRADES 6-12
Encouraging Global Citizenship & Critical Thinking in the 6-12 Classroom
Paul Bonnici, NC Civic Education Consortium, UNC-Chapel Hill
Do you want your students to better understand and appreciate global perspectives as well as be more critical thinkers? This session will focus on how to teach the skills of civic deliberation using a structured, small group process for reading, deep discussion and critical thinking regarding controversial global issues. Participate in a deliberation about climate change and learn how to access free on-line lesson plans that will help your students become better thinkers and readers.
Building a Sustainable City
David Salvesen, Sustainable Triangle Field Site, UNC-Chapel Hill
In the age of high-tech computer games, we will rely on an old school technique to engage participants in a process of building a sustainable city using cardboard boxes. The exercise will help participants think about the key ingredients for a sustainable city or town and understand the linkages between land use, transportation and environmental impacts.
Connecting Climate Change, Air Pollution, and Human Health Globally
Jason West, Environmental Sciences & Engineering, UNC-Chapel Hill
Climate change and air pollution are important issues in the U.S. and globally.  In this session participants will discuss the scientific basis for our current understanding of climate change and air pollution, emphasizing atmospheric science, and give some perspectives on the challenges these problems pose globally for the coming decades.  Jason West will also show examples of his recent research on how climate change and air pollution are connected to one another, and relate to human health impacts.
Hazardous Waste: From Local Issue to Global Impacts
Sarah Yelton, Institute for the Environment, UNC-Chapel Hill
Waste produced on one continent can affect life on the other side of the globe. We will zero in on hazardous waste as a local issue affecting communities here in North Carolina. This local problem can have global impacts as chemicals can persist in the environment for many years and travel thousands of miles. Through activity and discussion, we will explore the concepts of biomagnification, bioavailability and potential impacts to wildlife and human health around the world. We will also examine the concept of environmental justice as it applies to our disposal of hazardous waste and impacted communities.
Introducing Students to Environmental Justice
Scott Morrison, Education Department, Elon University
Environmental justice is the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin or income with respect to the development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies.  In this interactive session, participants will learn about the history of the environmental justice movement, which started in North Carolina, and see examples of the ways teachers can inform their students about environmental justice issues. Environmental justice is an interdisciplinary topic, but there will be a special emphasis on the use of pictures, maps, charts reading and writing.
The Drawbridge Strategy: A Case Study for Understanding Environmental Perspectives
Scott Morrison, Education Department, Elon University
The Drawbridge Strategy is a short story that serves as a springboard for students to discuss moral responsibility and ethical decision-making. In this interactive session, participants will read the story and practice the deliberation that could occur with their own students in the classroom. We will draw parallels to environmental degradation and the sustainability movement.
From Static to Dynamic: Tech Tools for Engaging Global Learners
Carina Brossy, World View, UNC-Chapel Hill
Do global issues related to poverty, conflict and environmental degradation seem far removed from your students’ daily lives? This session will survey technology resources and best practices in engaging students in real-life, global issues. What can seem like a one-dimensional, static issue can come alive when infused with elements of data visualization, the value of the spoken word, and the power of experiential learning.
Well, Water We Doing in Science Today?!
Crystal Harden, Amber Vogel, Daniel Wheeler
Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, UNC-Chapel Hill
Engage students in learning about aquatic habitats in North Carolina and around the world, water pollutants and techniques for providing safe water, and biotechnology applications of marine resources. Participants will receive lesson plans and materials for hands-on activities.
Fueling our Future: Evaluating Today’s and Tomorrow’s Global Energy System
Dana Haine, Institute for the Environment, UNC-Chapel Hill
In this session we will use a visualization of the world’s energy system as a spring board into a critical thinking activity, where the concept of sustainability will be used to evaluate the evolution of the world’s energy system. We will explore the benefits and challenges associated with the energy sources and technologies that will fuel our future and take Earth’s growing population to the year 2050.

GRADES 9-12

Student Travel with a Purpose
Tara Sivamani, Chris Waluk, Sarah Dancausse and Alicia Lee, Garner Magnet High School, Wake County Public Schools
Learn about the process of organizing and embarking on a spring break service trip to Guatemala with a group of high school students. Two teachers and two students will share their spring break experience of working with a community in La Limonada, the largest urban slum area in Central America. We will cover the details of organizing a service learning trip from planning cultural experiences prior to travel to maintaining connections after the trip.
Get the G.I.S.T.: The Journey to a Global Immersion School
Heather LaJoie, Martha Deiss and Deb Semmler, East Mecklenburg High School, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
East Mecklenburg High School has spent 2014-2015 on a global journey, exploring how to immerse students and staff in global issues and competencies. Anchoring the discussion through Food, Sustainability and Peace, a small group of teachers has explored issues of teacher and student engagement and how to effect change at a whole-school level.
 Building Global Partnerships: Focus on Environmental Issues
Eric Cole, McDowell High School, McDowell County Schools
This presentation discusses a partnership with a Danish National School in Germany and the students’ exchange program. The students live with host families and participate in projects and field trips that highlight cultural, political and environmental issues.
GRADES K-12
Teaching Environmental Sustainability through a UNICEF Lens
Daniel Sadowsky, Education, U.S. Fund for UNICEF
What does environmental sustainability mean for children? While many institutions have been working to address climate change and other matters, children have been largely ignored, even though it is their future that is most at stake. As the only UN organization whose legal mandate is to advocate for children globally, UNICEF calls for transitioning to a low-emission, climate resilient society, and for children’s voices to be heard in the process. In this session, participants will learn more about UNICEF’s position, the just-released UN Sustainable Development Goals, and more. As they engage in presentation, video, interactive exercises and small and large group discussion, participants will learn innovative ways to teach this content. They will leave with turnkey ideas for immediate use in any classroom, as well as free copies of our high-interest UNICEF ACT student magazine on climate change and resiliency.
Business of the Environment: Is Business Compatible with Environmental Practices?
Carol Hee, Kenan-Flagler Business School, UNC-Chapel Hill
Although some may view business goals and the environment as conflicting, leading mainstream companies have embraced sustainability as an integral component of their strategy. This session will explore what is meant by “triple bottom line”—that is, measuring business performance in terms of its effects on people (social equity), the planet (environmental stewardship) and profit (long-term economic performance). Objectives of the session include: explanation of the social and environmental drivers pushing companies to “go green;” illustration of strategies companies implement to benefit people, planet and profit; and identification of ways teachers can integrate sustainability concepts into their classes by making linkages to companies and products popular with their students. In contrast to sessions that focus on problems, this session will emphasize solutions, creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship—topics that can connect with students’ passions, thus providing fertile ground for student progress.
Cohorts or Engineers? Students Initiate Lasting Environmental Change on Campus
Simon Keilty, Charlotte Country Day School
This session will examine how eighth grade science students use their campus to study resource management and how we can encourage students to lead their community in lasting, environmentally sustainable change. Student investigations of waste streams and surface water quality that have improved campus sustainability will be shared along with the presenter’s current challenge to create engaging alternative energy and biodiversity investigations. Participants will be encouraged to share project ideas or experience and inspire other participants to pose practical, environmental questions that students can answer using relevant resources.
Connecting Cultures through Farming and Food: Transplanting Traditions
Kelly Owensby, Transplanting Traditions Community Farm, Orange County Partnership for Young Children
In this session participants will learn about Transplanting Traditions Community Farm, which provides a culturally grounded community based project for refugees from Burma. The farm provides a space for families to preserve and continue the rich agricultural traditions of their home, improve health, reduce food insecurity and increase income through marketing vegetables grown at the farm. The farm also provides programming to young children and teens of refugee families with the goal of teaching about sustainability and food justice.
Feeding 9 Billion and Beyond – The Importance of Scientific Literacy in Global Food Security
Greg Pillar, Environmental Science and Chemistry, Queens University
The projected increase in human population (over 9 billion by 2050) will necessitate a 50-75% increase in food production or access. In the last decade efforts to recruit and prepare highly-skilled individuals for careers in agriculture, renewable energy and environmental management have fallen short of those needed.  If we are to address significant and looming global issues such as food security a sustained and systemic effort is needed to not only prepare future scientists and agronomics but to create scientific literate consumers, educators, advocates and policymakers. This session will discuss resources and strategies to address the scientific literacy divide in order to address global issues in environmental stewardship, sustainability and food production.
Recipe for Disaster: Hollywood Science and Scientific Literacy
Greg Pillar, Environmental Science and Chemistry, Queens University
Disaster films are a genre that straddle the line between science and science fiction and often capitalize on our fears and limited knowledge of natural and unnatural disasters. Utilizing common plot techniques and special effects these films create a perceptual reality that many may interpret as a “true” scientific representation of common natural disasters. Although riddled with errors and stretched truths, these films can be used to develop critical thinking skills, improve scientific literacy and foster a better understanding of how natural disasters impact our global community. In this session we will examine how a myth-busting approach can be used to analyze these films and improve our understanding of real global natural disasters.
Global Opportunities on the Field: Lessons for Teachers and Students
Julia Vaughan, Charles T. Koontz Intermediate School, Buncombe County Schools
This presentation will give examples of field opportunities and grants for educators, particularly in ecological issues. Lesson examples influenced by field experiences will be provided, as well as resources to incorporate global and green education into curriculum.
Exploring the Environment through Digital Storytelling
Rebecca Morris, School of Education, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Today’s K-12 digital storytelling encompasses a range of tools, formats, and contexts for learning. At one time, digital storytelling was seen mostly as montages of images and videos set to music and narration. Although today’s classroom and school library applications still include this form, students, teachers and school librarians can now use an array of approaches to tell digital stories, including via tweets, Vine videos, single-image stories and “Draw My Life” whiteboard narratives. Through storytelling contexts from science content to poetry and self-reflection, digital storytelling fosters creativity, collaboration, digital literacy, critical thinking and aligns with cross-curricular learning objectives. In this session, participants will have the opportunity to practice some apps for integrating digital storytelling into environmental topics. Having a laptop, tablet, or smart phone is encouraged but not required.
Travel Abroad with World View! Information Session and Discussion
Neil Bolick and Charlé LaMonica, World View, UNC-Chapel Hill
Björn Hennings, Carolina Center for Educational Excellence, UNC-Chapel Hill
Odilie Calvo, Immersion Abroad Costa Rica
This session will provide information about World View international study visits taking place the summer of 2016. World View will conduct two study visits: one group of educators will travel to Germany and one group of educators will travel to Costa Rica and Nicaragua.  Participants will visit schools, colleges, non-governmental organizations and significant historic and cultural sites to gain an in-depth understanding of the countries and regions and to experience a culture different from their own. Pre-and post-trip workshops ensure participants are well prepared before they leave and supported afterwards integrating what they’ve learned into their teaching. Attend this session to learn how this international experience will benefit you as an educator.
State Board of Education Strategic Plan: Global-Ready Schools and Educators
Helga Fasciano, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
This session will focus on the timeline and requirements for the Global-Ready Schools/Districts and the expanded Global Educator Digital Badge. Participants will explore the schools rubrics and engage in embedding global awareness practices while teaching the NC Standard Course of Study.
The Green Dream – An Elementary School’s Journey to Become a NC Green School of Excellence
Cathy Dalimonte, Rebecca Harris, Jason Barnes, Krystal Miller and Kristin Reid
Queens Creek Elementary School, Onslow County Schools
Queens Creek Elementary (QCE) is an International Green themed school. The QCE staff will share how they became one of only three schools to be named a 2015 North Carolina Green School of Excellence and how they integrate environmental education, outdoor learning, community outreach and global understanding into their NCSCOS lessons to drive their “Green Dream” and empower global eco-minded learners. Although the elementary experience will be shared, the information can also be applicable to middle and high school.
Global Education Teacher Leader Meeting
Julie Kinnaird, World View, UNC-Chapel Hill
This session is for educators currently participating in World View’s yearlong Global Education Teacher Leader Program, a new initiative that builds classroom teachers’ capacity for practice and leadership in global education. The 2015-16 cohort began with a weeklong institute in June and is provided with support for global education throughout the year through coaching, professional development and resources. Teacher Leaders will foster collaboration and innovation in their schools to promote the integration of global education activities. This meeting will advance the program, share resources and strategies and discussing personal goals.
Sustainability at Work and Home
Cindy Shea and Kristin Blank-White, Sustainability Office, UNC-Chapel Hill
Advance environmental quality, economic prosperity and societal well-being at both school and work. Join Sustainability @ UNC for an overview of sustainability concepts, current trends and global impacts. Then learn about opportunities to adopt sustainable practices related to purchasing, energy, water, waste, food and health and wellness.
Withering the Waste Stream – Understanding Waste, Recycling and Compost for Individuals, Schools and Communities
Muriel Williman, Orange County Solid Waste Management
Dan Schnitzer, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City School District
Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools compost and recycle nearly all wastes coming out of cafeterias system-wide.  Dan Schnitzer, School Sustainability Coordinator, will describe overcoming the challenges to make this program work, with scalable examples to apply to just about any situation or material.  Muriel Williman will dissect the waste stream, local rules and the big picture, busting myths and empowering educators to maximize waste diversion strategies with teaching tools for their classrooms and their daily lives.  Session will include conducting a waste assessment and vermicomposting for the classroom.

Readings & Study Guide:
Week 1: Emailed Article – (29 August 2015). Top 10 Envrionmental Issues Facing Our Planet.  Planet Earth Herald. 

Week 2: Emailed Article – Connolly, Kate. (8 June 2015). G7 leaders agree to phase out fossil fuel use by end of centuryThe Guardian.

Koch, Wendy. (17 September 2015). Which Cities in the World are Closest to Nixing Fossil Fuels?National Geographic. 

Week 3: Emailed Video and Article – Su, Mike. (2 March 2015). Everyone waited for it to be taken down. 150 million views later, it’s still up. Watch it here.  Upworthy.

Dwyer, Liz. (23 September 2015). Interactive Map Lets You See the Air Quality of 1,000 Places Around the Global. Takepart. 

Week 4: Emailed Article, Web-based Resource and Study Guide – United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (September 2015). Sustainable Development Goals (as defined in Transforming Our World – the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development). Retrieved from: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/topics

Kenny, Charles. (29 September 2015). If Everyone Gets Electricity, Can the Planet Survive? The Atlantic.

STUDY GUIDE

Week 5: Emailed Article – The Editorial Board. (10 October 2015). Teaching the Truth About Climate Change. The New York Times.