2015 LATIN AMERICA AND NORTH CAROLINA SEMINAR

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Flyer  |  Schedule  | Concurrent Session DescriptionsEmailed Articles, Readings, and Study Guide

March 24-25, 2015

speakers
Registration is $175 for one seminar and $325 for both.
A team of 4+ attending the SAME seminar is $150 per person.

Co-sponsored by the Duke-UNC Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Jack and Mary McCall Charitable Foundation, UNC College of Arts and Sciences, UNC Curriculum in Global Studies and UNC Global.

Opening Keynote Speaker

Kevin KallaugherKevin Kallaugher. Kevin Kallaugher (KAL) is the international award-winning editorial cartoonist for The Economist magazine of London and The Baltimore Sun. In a distinguished career that spans 36 years, He has created over 8,000 cartoons and 140 magazine covers. His resumé includes six collections of his published work including his celebrated anthology of Economist cartoons titled Daggers Drawn (2013). Kallaugher’s work has been exhibited in a dozen countries receiving awards and honors in seven. He has created acclaimed animations and calendars, toured the U.S. with Second City improv comedy troupe and addressed audiences around the world. Kallaugher, a Norwalk, Connecticut native and Harvard graduate, is currently the artist-in-residence at University of Maryland Baltimore County. In 1999, The World Encyclopedia of Cartoons said of Kevin “Commanding a masterful style, Kallaugher stands among the premier caricaturists of the (twentieth) century.”

Kal by Moyse (2)Dagger Drawn

Featured Speakers

seg-homepage1Stephanie Elizondo Griest. Stephanie Elizondo Griest has mingled with the Russian Mafia, polished Chinese propaganda, and danced with Cuban rumba queens. These adventures inspired her award-winning memoirs Around the Bloc: My Life in Moscow, Beijing, and HavanaMexican Enough: My Life Between the Borderlines; and the guidebook 100 Places Every Woman Should Go. As a national correspondent for The Odyssey, she once drove 45,000 miles across America in a Honda Hatchback named Bertha. She has won a Hodder Fellowship to Princeton, a Viebranz Professorship to St. Lawrence University, the Margolis Award for Social Justice Reporting, and a Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism Gold Prize. A renowned speaker, Stephanie has taught and performed around the globe, and is currently an assistant professor and Margaret R. Shuping Fellow of Creative Nonfiction at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


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Sarah Plastino. Sarah Plastino is the supervising attorney for Pro Bono Programs in the Newark, New Jersey office of Kids in Need of Defense (KIND). KIND is a national organization that provides quality and compassionate legal counsel to unaccompanied immigration children in deportation proceedings. In Newark, Plastino oversees a docket of over 100 children fleeing abuse, neglect, violence and trafficking in Central America. Prior to joining KIND, Plastino was a staff attorney at the National Immigrant Justice Center in Chicago, IL, where she represented detained and non-detained LGBT asylum seekers. Plastino received her J.D., cum laude, and certificate in Refugee and Humanitarian Emergencies from Georgetown University Law Center. Plastino has interned at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the U.S. Department of State. She was also a legal assistant at the Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project, in Florence, AZ, where she provided free legal services to detained immigrants appearing without counsel in deportation proceedings. Sarah received her B.A. in public policy analysis and international studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she co-founded the APPLES Global Course Guanajuato, studying the local and global aspects of migration from Guanajuato, Mexico, to North Carolina. She is admitted to practice law in New York.


Daisy_BoschStudios-5Daisy Hernández. Daisy Hernández is the author of A Cup of Water Under My Bed: A Memoir and the Kenan Visiting Writer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is also the co-editor of the anthology Colonize This! Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism. Hernández’ writing has been featured in the New York Times, Ms. Magazine, and NPR, among others. She previously worked for Ms. Magazine, the New York Times, and ColorLines, a newsmagazine on race and politics. While a writer for ColorLines, her article “Becoming a Black Man,” about how transgender people of color experience race when they transition from one gender to another, was nominated for a 2009 GLAAD Media Award. Her essays have appeared in several anthologies, including 50 Ways to Support Lesbian and Gay Equality, Without a Net: The Female Experience of Growing Up Working Class, and Border-Line Personalities: A New Generation of Latinas Dish on Sex, Sass, and Cultural Shifting. Hernandez received a B.A. in English at William Paterson University, an M.A. in journalism and Caribbean and Latin American studies at New York University, and an M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of Miami.

Schedule At-A-Glance*

Tuesday, March 24 Wednesday, March 25
8:30 CHECK IN AND REGISTRATION 8:00 LIGHT CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
9:00 WELCOME
Javier Díaz de León, Mexican Consul General
8:30 A CUP OF WATER UNDER MY BED: A MEMOIR
Daisy Hernández, Kenan Visiting Writer
UNC at Chapel Hill
9:15 DRAWING CRITICISM: THE CHALLENGING LIFE OF AN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL CARTOONIST
Kevin “Kal” Kallaugher, Political Cartoonist
The Economist
9:30 ART AGAINST THE BORDER WALL
Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Assistant Professor and Margaret R. Shuping Fellow of Creative Nonfiction
Department of English and
Comparative Literature
UNC at Chapel Hill
10:30 BREAK 10:30 BREAK AND BOOK SIGNING
10:45 CONCURRENT SESSIONS I:
Understanding and Teaching Latin America
10:45
STUDENTS’ VOICES: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES OF TODAY’S LATINA AND LATINO STUDENTS
Panel of Students

Durham School of the ArtsMelba Payan Martinez, Teacher
Durham School of the ArtsMelissa Perez, Moderator
GRADES K-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE 12:00 ADJOURN
1. Nicaragua & Costa Rica Facing the World in the 21st Century: Economic and Education Overview
Odilie Calvo Alfaro
Immersion Abroad Costa Rica
2. Walking in the Footsteps of Darwin: UNC’s Program of Research, Education & Community Engagement in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador
Stephen J. Walsh
Department of Geography
UNC at Chapel Hill and Galápagos Science Center, Ecuador
3. Violence and the State in Mexico
Altha Cravey
Department of Geography
UNC at Chapel Hill
4. New Roots Latino Oral Histories and the Latino Migration Project
Hannah Gill and Jessica English
Latino Migration Project
Institute for the Study of the Americas
UNC at Chapel Hill
5. The Politics of Cuba-US Relations in Historical Context
Louis Pérez
Department of History and Institute for the Study of the Americas
UNC at Chapel Hill
12:00 LUNCH AND STUDY VISIT ORIENTATIONS
1:15 UNACCOMPANIED IMMIGRANT CHILDREN: BACKGROUND, TRAUMA, AND CONSIDERATIONS FOR EDUCATORS
Sarah I. Plastino
Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
New York City Children on the Run
DOJ Fact Sheet on Educational Rights
DOJ Fact Sheet on Educational Rights in Spanish
NC Legal Service Organizations
2:15 CONCURRENT SESSIONS II:
Teaching Latin America and Latino Students
GRADES K-12
6. Help! Reaching and Teaching ESL Students
Christina Livingstone and Sarah Wood
Brogden Middle School
Durham Public Schools
GRADES K-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
7. Education and Family Involvement in Mexico
Mónica Colín Gutiérrez, Manager
Community, Political, Economic, and Cultural Affairs
Consulate General of Mexico, Raleigh
8. Education for Sustainability in Galápagos: A Public-Private Partnership for Strengthening Education in the Islands
Nick Cabot
School of Education
UNC at Chapel Hill
9. Exploring Latin American Culture through Music
Juan Álamo
Department of Music
UNC at Chapel Hill
GRADES 9-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
10. Telling History, Telling Fiction: Bridging Latina/o Identities and Latina/o Fiction
Kristy Ulibarri
Department of English
East Carolina University
3:30 BREAK
CONCURRENT SESSIONS III: LATINOS IN NORTH CAROLINA
GRADES K-12
11. Unaccompanied Minors and the Educational Experience: Current Challenges
George Eppsteiner
Southern Coalition for Social Justice
12. Academic Language: The Key to Learning
Amanda B. Miller
Wake County Public Schools
GRADES K-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
13. Ethnic Identity in Latino Youth: Promoting Positive Outcomes and Mental Health
Lisa Kiang
Department of Psychology
Wake Forest University
14. Latin American Teaching Resources from the UNC-Duke Consortium
Emily Chávez
Consortium in Latin American & Caribbean Studies
Duke University and UNC at Chapel Hill
GRADES 9-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
15. Accessing Higher Education: Support for Latina/o Students
Jazmin Garcia Smith
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
UNC at Chapel Hill
5:00 RECEPTION
Friday Center
UNC at Chapel Hill

Concurrent Session Descriptions

CONCURRENT SESSIONS I:  Understanding and Teaching Latin America 
GRADES K-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
1. Nicaragua & Costa Rica Facing the World in the 21st Century: Economic and Education Overview
Odilie Calvo Alfaro, Executive Co-Director and Founder, Immersion Abroad Costa Rica
In this session, participants will be invited to discuss the economics and educational systems of each of these beautiful countries.This session will also cover a history of poverty and disasters in Central America. Participants will explore the steps Nicaragua and Costa Rica took just after their independence that resulted in such different futures for each country.
2. Walking in the Footsteps of Darwin: UNC’s Program of Research, Education & Community Engagement in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador
Stephen J. Walsh, Professor, Department of Geography, UNC at Chapel Hill and Director, UNC Galápagos Science Center, Ecuador
The Galápagos Islands are a “living laboratory” for the study of evolution, global environmental change, and the conflicts between nature and society. Free of humans and predators for almost all of its history, these “Enchanted Islands” have developed some of the most unique life forms on the planet, highly adapted to their harsh surroundings and living in ecological isolation from the rest of the world. Today, the Galápagos Islands are in crisis. Beginning in the 1970’s, they began to draw thousands of new residents, attracted by the promise of lucrative opportunities linked to the islands’ rich marine and terrestrial ecosystems and employment opportunities in construction, fisheries, and tourism. As part of Carolina’s response to the many challenges that face the Galápagos Islands, the Galápagos Initiative was created, linking UNC at Chapel Hill and the Universidad San Francisco de Quito. In this session, participants will learn more about the history of the islands and the UNC Galápagos Science Center’s research.
3. Violence and the State of Mexico
Altha Cravey, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, UNC at Chapel Hill
When forty-three education students went missing after being arrested by police in Iguala, Guerrero in Mexico, public approval swiftly turned against Mexican president Peña Nieto. This session will consider that incident, public reaction, wider implications, and historical and geographic context surrounding the students’ disappearance and presumed deaths. There will also be time for questions, answers, and discussion.
4. New Roots Latino Oral Histories and the Latino Migration Project
Hannah Gill, Research Associate and Jessica English, Bilingual Documentation Archivist for New Roots Latino Oral Histories, Latino Migration Project, Institute for the Study of the Americas, UNC at Chapel Hill
Hannah Gill, Director of the Latino Migration Project at UNC Chapel Hill, and Jessica English, Bilingual Documentation Archivist of the New Roots Oral History Project, will talk about this growing collection of oral histories focused on issues related to Latino migration to North Carolina and the formation of Latino communities. Read more here: http://migration.unc.edu/programs/new-roots-nuevas-raices/. As part of this presentation, they will be sharing teaching activities involving the archive’s contents. They are interested in connecting with K-12 teachers as part of an outreach initiative involving the oral histories in 2016.
5. The Politics of Cuba-US Relations in Historical Context
Louis Pérez, Professor, Department of History and Director, Institute for the Study of the Americas, UNC at Chapel Hill
This session will explore the historical antecedents of current Cuba-U.S. relations, with particular focus on the period of the Cuban revolution.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS II:  Teaching Latin America and Latino Students
GRADES K-12
6. Help! Reaching and Teaching ESL Students
Christina Livingstone and Sarah Wood, Teachers, Brogden Middle School, Durham Public Schools
This session describes practical teaching strategies for building reading, writing, math, and vocabulary skills for ESL students in ESL classrooms and mainstream settings. Ideas will be offered for the elementary, middle, and high school classroom.
GRADES K-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
7. Education and Family Involvement in Mexico
Mónica Colín Gutiérrez, Manager of Community, Political, Economic, and Cultural Affairs, Consulate General of Mexico, Raleigh
This session will provide information on the Mexican education system, which can help educators better understand the schools that some of their students and their students’ parents may have come from and provide a comparison for the education system in North Carolina. Participants will discuss ways to increase Hispanic/Latino parental involvement in schools, thus strengthening the family, school, and community partnership. Speaker will also provide information on continuing education programs available to the community through the Consulate General of Mexico.
8. Education for Sustainability in Galápagos: A Public-Private Partnership for Strengthening Education in the Islands
Nick Cabot, Associate Professor, School of Education, UNC at Chapel Hill
This session will offer an overview of education in the Galápagos Islands, including K-12 and two year college programs. The session will also explore the results of a 2014 observation study by the Galápagos Conservancy and the Scalesia Foundation to determine the state of education in the Islands. The study involved observation and data collection and incorporated the expertise of teachers, school administrators, and local stake holders. The results of this study will be used to identify priorities for improving preK-12 education in ways that prepare resident youth to assume their pivotal role in shaping a sustainable society in the Islands.
9. Exploring Latin American Culture through Music
Juan Álamo, Assistant Professor, Department of Music, UNC at Chapel Hill
This session will illustrate how music can be used as a platform to explore and understand Latin American culture. Participants will have an opportunity to listen to and play various percussion instruments. Participants will also learn about the rhythms and musical styles of Brazil, Cuba, and Puerto Rico.  As a result, participants will further enhance their knowledge about the culture of these countries. This session will also give participants ideas on incorporating basic rhythms and percussion instruments in their classroom discussions about Latin American culture.
GRADES 9-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
10. Telling History, Telling Fiction: Bridging Latina/o Identities and Latina/o Fiction
Kristy Ulibarri, Assistant Professor, Department of English, East Carolina University
This session will offer strategies in using contemporary Latina/o literature as a way to teach the many ethnicities and histories of Latinas/os, while also teaching the ways in which literature can revise and re-imagine these histories. In numerous texts, both Latin American and Latina/o, the line between historical reality and fiction becomes ambiguous, such as Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Helena Maria Viramontes’ Their Dogs Came with Them, and Irene Vilar’s The Ladies Gallery. While this literary device often worked as a form of magical realism in Latin American literature, it now works more as a way to make sense of immigrant identities in Latina/o literature. Getting students to distinguish between what is the historical reality and the revision of this history can help them see the malleability of one’s history and encourage them to consider why it constructs one’s identity in America.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS III: Latinos in North Carolina
GRADES K-12
11. Unaccompanied Minors & the Educational Experience: Current Challenges
George Eppsteiner, Staff Attorney, Southern Coalition for Social Justice
This session will explore the current challenges facing immigrant parents and their children in schools. Specifically, this session will look at the recent increase in unaccompanied immigrant children coming from Latin America and their unique educational challenges in U.S. schools. These challenges include the role of a non-parent sponsor in the child’s educational experience, access to translation and counseling services, and underlying causes of migration.
12. Academic Language: The Key to Learning
Amanda B. Miller, Title III/ESL Coordinating Teacher, Wake County Public Schools
Often, academic language is viewed as merely teaching content vocabulary. However, vocabulary is only one dimension of academic language. In this session we will lay a foundation for understanding why it is important to teach academic language in context, approaches to teaching academic language in the classroom, and the importance of engaging students in academic discourse. The session will also examine the role of background knowledge and academic discourse in the transfer of academic language across disciplines.
GRADES K-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
13. Ethnic Identity in Latino Youth: Promoting Positive Outcomes and Mental Health
Lisa Kiang, Associate Professor of Psychology, Wake Forest University
This session will present a broad overview of how ethnic identity plays a role in the lives of adolescents from Latino/a backgrounds. The different ways that ethnic identity can be defined and measured will also be illustrated.  This session will also explore how adolescents’ sense of ethnic connectedness and the ethnic labels they use to define themselves can promote well-being and mental health.
GRADES 9-12 AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
14. Accessing Higher Education: Support for Latina/o Students
Jazmin Garcia Smith, Senior Assistant Director, Office of Undergraduate Admissions, UNC at Chapel Hill
Join UNC’s senior assistant director of undergraduate admissions for a session that explores challenges and opportunities Latina/o students face when accessing higher education. The session will provide support for educators working with Latina/o students who are interested in entering or transferring into the university system. Garcia Smith will share strategies that address issues such as recruitment and qualifications for acceptance and how educators can promote messages within their schools and community colleges and encourage all students to go to college.

Emailed Readings, Articles, and Study Guide

Week 1: Emailed Article – Hernandez, Daisy. “On Publishing a First Memoir.”  Huffington Post. 20 October 2014.

Week 2: Emailed Article – Burnett, Sara. “Welcoming Immigrant Students Into the Classroom.” Edutopia.  27 January 2015.

Week 3: Emailed Articles and Study Guide – Krogstad, Jens Manuel and Lopez, Mark Hugo. Hispanic Nativity Shift. Pew Research Center.  Hispanic Trends. April 2014.

Martínez, Rubén.  “At the Crossroads: Latinos in the New Millennium.” From PBS’s American Family Series website.

Santa Ana, Otto. “Is there Such a Thing as Latino Identity?” From PBS’s American Family Series website.

Week 4: Emailed Article – Griest, Stephanie Elizondo. “Code 500.” Oxford American. Fall 2013: 35-37.

Week 5: Emailed Article – Vasquez, Ehiracenia, “Life Without Papers.” The New York Times. March 2, 2014.