2018 Workshop



April 26-27, 2018


The Carolina Center for Educational Excellence

1.5 CEU offered




The Creating a Global Media Center Workshop explores strategies, media content and technology tools to bring the world to North Carolina’s schools. The program is designed to help K-12 school librarians and technology facilitators better understand our interconnected world by learning with and through technology and relevant resources. The workshop offers strategies to support the creation of inclusive global media centers as well as ways to use technologies and other innovative resources to foster global learning and support teachers and students though the school media center.


Schedule  | Session DescriptionsSpeakers  |  Program Materials  |  Lodging & Directions

Schedule

 THURSDAY, APRIL 26
12:30 p.m. Registration and Check-In
1:00 p.m. Welcome Holly Loranger and Charlé LaMonica, World View, UNC-Chapel Hill
1:15 p.m. Thinking Beyond Books: Transforming Your School Library for Equity Sandra Hughes-Hassell, Professor and President of the Young Adult Library Services Association, School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill Casey Rawson, Postdoctoral Research Associate, School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill Kimberly Hirsh, Ph.D. Student, School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill
2:15 p.m. Break
2:30 p.m. Growing Global Communities Colleen Pinyan, Media Specialist, Brooks Global Studies Magnet School, Guilford County Schools
3:30 p.m. techTalk: SAMR and the Global Classroom Jonathan Permar, Director of Social Studies, Guilford County Schools
4:30 p.m. Adjourn
 FRIDAY, APRIL 27
8:00 a.m. Coffee and Pastries
8:30 a.m. Copyright in the Global Village Anne Gilliland, Scholarly Communications Officer, University Libraries, UNC-Chapel Hill
9:30 a.m. The Possibilities of Personalized Learning Adam Garry, Director of Education Strategy, Dell EMC
10:30 a.m. Break
10:45 a.m. Is Your School Library “Future Ready”? Sedley Abercrombie, Lead Library Media Coordinator, Davidson County Schools
11:45 a.m. Lunch
12:45 p.m. Why Culture Matters Carina Brossy, Outreach Specialist
2:00 p.m. Fostering Cultural Competency through Digital Storytelling Carina Brossy, Outreach Specialist
2:45 p.m. Break
3:00 p.m. Agents of Change: Equity and the Role of School Libraries to Empower Youth Kathryn Cole, School Librarian, Northside Elementary School, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools Julie Stivers, Teacher Librarian, Mount Vernon Middle, Wake County Public School System
4:00 p.m. Action Plans and Next Steps for Your Media Center Holly Loranger and Julie Kinnaird, World View, UNC-Chapel Hill
4:30 p.m. Adjourn
 

Session Descriptions

Thinking Beyond Books: Transforming Your School Library for Equity Sandra Hughes-Hassell, Professor and President of the Young Adult Library Services Association, School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill Casey Rawson, Postdoctoral Research Associate, School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill Kimberly Hirsh, Ph.D. Student, School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill In this session, presenters will share a framework for assessing and improving your school library’s space, collection, policies, staffing and instruction through an equity lens. Participants will leave with a framework for characteristics of effective library services for diverse youth. Participants will also leave this session with a tool they can use to evaluate their library’s current space and services from an equity standpoint. Growing Global Communities Colleen Pinyan, Media Specialist, Brooks Global Studies Magnet School, Guilford County Schools  Today’s school librarians face the challenge of preparing students to succeed in our ever-expanding global community. We must transform our libraries into global media centers so our students develop the necessary tools and skills to become productive global citizens in their communities. Join Colleen Pinyan, Media Specialist at Brooks Global Studies Magnet School, as she leads a discussion about lesson plans, resources and practical ideas to make your library the hub for building global community at your school. techTalk: SAMR and the Global Classroom Jonathan Permar, Director of Social Studies, Guilford County Schools In this session, participants will explore the SAMR Framework for technology integration, noting how educators can find themselves at different spots on the “technology ladder.” We will then explore different tech tools that can be used in the classroom as a means to inspire individual practice and collaborative work, both within and beyond the classroom walls. Copyright in the Global Village Anne Gilliland, Scholarly Communications Officer, University Libraries, UNC-Chapel Hill How does the internet change copyright law? Now, do we need to keep up with other countries’ copyright laws, too? How can our teaching and resource creation be effective while still respecting international norms for intellectual property? In this session, we’ll discuss these issues along with some copyright basics. The Possibilities of Personalized Learning Adam Garry, Director of Education Strategy, Dell EMC Adam will share a vision for personalizing student learning by describing what makes school powerful. He will start by ensuring that we understand how the world around us creates the opportunity to shift how students learn and shift to more personalized approaches. This will lead into a conversation around how we define educated and practical ways to shift to more personalized approaches. Adam will also offer a clear, student-centered definition of personalized learning. Is Your School Library “Future Ready”? Sedley Abercrombie, Lead Library Media Coordinator, Davidson County Schools What exactly does that look like? Decades of research show that effective school library programs correlate with higher student achievement – yet how do you know if your library makes the grade? Attendees will learn about the Future Ready Librarian framework launched in 2016 from the U.S. Department of Education and will dig deep into each of the eight components. Stakeholders will learn how to take a critical look at their current program and sketch out a plan to better support the Digital Learning Competencies initiative laid out by NCDPI. Why Culture Matters Carina Brossy, Outreach Specialist Everyone has cultural values. They shape how we see the world, our school communities and ourselves. In order to best prepare students to effectively communicate in culturally diverse environments, educators must gain knowledge and strategies to teach with a broader worldview. This session introduces the four primary building blocks of culture, provides interactive dialogue and self-analysis of personal worldviews and offers tools for creating culturally sensitive learning environments. Participants also will explore how globalization, localization and media play a growing role in shaping cultural perspectives in the 21st century. Fostering Cultural Competency through Digital Storytelling Carina Brossy, Outreach Specialist Throughout history, humans have practiced the art of storytelling as a way to communicate information and ideas. Because we are hardwired to relate to stories, digital storytelling has become an effective tool to help students broaden their understanding of cultures and better interpret more complex global issues through the power of personal narrative. This session introduces educators to globally focused digital storytelling and provides interactive activities for unwrapping digital content (mass media, photo essays, oral testimonies) as well as resources for crafting meaningful narratives. Agents of Change: Equity and the Role of School Libraries to Empower Youth Kathryn Cole, School Librarian, Northside Elementary School, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools Julie Stivers, Teacher Librarian, Mount Vernon Middle, Wake County Public School System How do libraries serve as incubators for change? Come learn about ways to create equitable and culturally relevant library spaces through your collection, collaborative practices and instructional content. Two librarians will share their journey working with students to examine identity, amplify voice and connect to community.

Speakers

Sedley Abercrombie is the lead library media coordinator for Davidson County Schools, currently serving 32 school libraries. She is also the immediate past president for the North Carolina School Library Media Association and an adjunct instructor in the Library Science program at East Carolina University. Carina Brossy is a World View outreach specialist with over 15 years of global education experience. As World View’s former assistant director for curriculum, Carina worked with schools and colleges to integrate global competencies across disciplines and grade levels. She has led World View programs to Honduras, Costa Rica, India and Russia. Prior to World View, Carina served as a middle school teacher connecting her students to the world through domestic and international programs. Carina has a B.A. in Spanish and international affairs and speaks Spanish, French and some Mandarin. Kathryn Cole is a National Board Certified librarian at Northside Elementary School in Chapel Hill, NC. She received her B.A. in elementary education and her Masters of Library Science from UNC-Chapel Hill. She was a 2016 recipient of the American Library Association’s “I Love My Librarian” award. She currently serves as an adjunct instructor at UNC School of Library Science where she teaches the children’s literature course. She believes the library is the heart of a school and literature has the power to shift narratives and transform education. Adam Garry is a former elementary school teacher and is now Dell’s director of education strategy. He has presented at conferences around the world and published many articles on technology integration for several education magazines and has a strong following on Twitter. Over the past twelve years, he has consulted in school districts on school transformation, professional learning, one-to-one, the shift from print to digital, personalized learning, curriculum and instruction and leadership. He is the author of “Teaching the iGeneration” and “Personalized Learning Through Voice and Choice.” Anne T. Gilliland, scholarly communications officer at UNC-Chapel Hill libraries, provides guidance, policy development and advocacy to UNC faculty, students and staff on copyright, authors’ rights, privacy rights, open access and other policy related to scholarly material. She has an M.S. in library and information science from the University of Tennessee and a J.D. from Capital University. Sandra Hughes-Hassell is a professor in the School of Information and Library Science at UNC-Chapel Hill and president of the Young Adult Library Services Association. In her current research, she focuses on social justice issues in youth library services, diverse youth literature and culturally responsive professional development. Kimberly Hirsh is a Ph.D. student in UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Information and Library Science, research assistant for Project READY and a former high school Latin teacher, middle school librarian and managing editor of LEARN NC. Her research interests include connected learning in libraries and the professional development of school librarians. Jonathan Permar is in his eleventh year in education. He started as an elementary and middle school English teacher in rural Japan. Upon his return, he began teaching high school social studies and working with his district on curriculum development for world and American history curricula and leading professional development. He eventually became a personalized learning facilitator in instructional technology in Guilford County Schools, supporting teachers in creating more student-centered experiences through technology. Now, he has moved back to his content area as the director of social studies, leading the GCS social studies department in their work around the district. He is passionate about providing students with authentic learning experiences that allow them to explore their community, their government and the world. Jonathan holds a bachelor of arts in history from Elon University, and an M.B.A. from the Poole College of Management at NC State University. Colleen Pinyan is in her seventh year as media specialist at Brooks Global Studies Magnet School in Guilford County. She views the library as a vehicle for developing global citizens and empowering teachers to deliver global content. She has previously presented at the L2L Summit, the NCSLMA Annual Conference and World View. She was the 2015 Media Specialist of the Year in Guilford County and a finalist at the state level in 2016. She received her B.A. from Wake Forest University, her JD from UNC School of Law and her MLS from East Carolina University. Casey Rawson is a postdoctoral research associate at UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Information and Library Science, where she earned her Ph.D. in 2016 and MSLS in 2011. She is working on Project READY, an IMLS-funded project that aims to create and implement professional development for school librarians and their collaborators focused on culturally sustaining pedagogy and racial equity. Julie Stivers is in her third year as the librarian at Mount Vernon Middle School, an alternative public school in Raleigh, NC, where she loves helping students find and devour engaging, reflective literature. She is the recipient of AASL’s 2017 Frances Henne Award and was recognized as a 2018 ALA Emerging Leader. Her research and professional interests include culturally sustaining pedagogy, inclusive library spaces and finding creative ways to dismantle the traditional literary canon.

Program Materials

In order to earn 1.5 CEU credits for the workshop, you must complete the readings (below) and the study guide.
  • In Digital Literacy for Digital Natives, Jessica Lander discusses some of the challenges students and educators face in becoming critical consumers of online information in the new media landscape.
  • In the blog posts on The Inclusive Library (part 1 and part 2), authors (and featured presenters) Sandra Hughes-Hassell and Julie Stivers detail the importance of creating inclusive libraries.
  • Finally, click the following Storycorps link to hear Storm Reyes describe the power of the bookmobile in providing access to information  and in opening up a whole new world for her during a very difficult childhood as a migrant farmer.

Lodging & Directions

Hampton Inn & Suites (919) 969-6988 370 East Main St., Unit 100 Carrboro, NC 27510 Rate – $139.00, guaranteed until April 5, 2018 Rooms can be booked by calling the hotel directly and mentioning UNC World View’s Media Workshop or via this link